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Thoughts of a Catholic convert

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Thursday, March 07, 2013

David Bentley Hart writes on natural law

Is, Ought, and Nature’s Laws ...

There is a long, rich, varied, and subtle tradition of natural law theory, almost none of which I find especially convincing, but most of which I acknowledge to be—according to the presuppositions of the intellectual world in which it was gestated—perfectly coherent. My skepticism, moreover, has nothing to do with any metaphysical disagreement. I certainly believe in a harmony between cosmic and moral order, sustained by the divine goodness in which both participate. I simply do not believe that the terms of that harmony are as precisely discernible as natural law thinkers imagine.

That is an argument for another time, however. My chief topic here is the attempt in recent years by certain self-described Thomists, particularly in America, to import this tradition into public policy debates, but in a way amenable to modern political culture. What I have in mind is a style of thought whose proponents (names are not important) believe that compelling moral truths can be deduced from a scrupulous contemplation of the principles of cosmic and human nature, quite apart from special revelation, and within the context of the modern conceptual world. This, it seems to me, is a hopeless cause ...


Then Aquinas devotee Edward Feser says he's wrong - A Christian Hart, a Humean Head

And Samuel Goldman writes about the merits of the arguments - Why Natural Law Is ‘Hopeless’ - coming down on the side of Hart.

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